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Trial Overview

Our current asthma trial is for individuals 12 years of age and older with asthma. This trial can take up to a period of 30 weeks with a total of 10 clinic visits. You are compensated for your time and are provided asthma related medical care free of charge. There are no overnight visits and we offer flexibility in scheduling your clinic appointments.


Asthma is a condition in which your airways narrow and swell and produce extra mucus. This can make breathing difficult and trigger coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath.

For some people, asthma is a minor nuisance. For others, it can be a major problem that interferes with daily activities and may lead to a life-threatening asthma attack.

Asthma can't be cured, but its symptoms can be controlled. Because asthma often changes over time, it's important that you work with your doctor to track your signs and symptoms and adjust treatment as needed.


Symptoms of asthma can be mild or severe. You may have mild attacks now and then, or you may have severe symptoms every day, or you may have something in between. How often you have symptoms can also change. When you have asthma, you may:

  • Wheeze, making a loud or soft whistling noise that occurs when you breathe in and out.
  • Cough a lot.
  • Feel tightness in your chest.
  • Feel short of breath.
  • Have trouble sleeping because of coughing or having a hard time breathing.
  • Quickly get tired during exercise.
  • Your symptoms may be worse at night.
  • Severe asthma attacks can be life-threatening and need emergency treatment.

How is Asthma Diagnosed?

Along with doing a physical exam and asking about your health, your doctor may order lung function tests. These tests include:

  • Spirometry. Doctors use this test to diagnose and keep track of asthma. It measures how quickly you can move air in and out of your lungs and how much air you move.
  • Peak expiratory flow (PEF). This shows how fast you can breathe out when you try your hardest.
  • An exercise or inhalation challenge. This test measures how quickly you can breathe after exercise or after taking a medicine.
  • A chest X-ray, to see if another disease is causing your symptoms.
  • Allergy tests, if your doctor thinks your symptoms may be caused by allergies.




If you have been diagnosed with Asthma or have a history of Asthma symptoms, contact us today to learn more about our current study opportunities for this diagnosis.

Signup online at https://www.lillestolresearch.com/sign-up or email our recruiter at recruiter(at)lillestolresearch(dot)com.

Call us at (701) 232-7705 or toll-free at (866) 532-7705.